N. 7 (2021): Soggetti transnazionali e identità interculturali: il viaggio e il Sud Globale
Articoli

“Voicing Creative Uprisings”: Women and the Nigerian Diaspora in Buchi Emecheta’s Second-Class Citizen and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Americanah

Isabella Villanova
University of Padua
Gold Antique Compass

Pubblicato 2022-03-31 — Aggiornato il 2022-04-01

Versioni

Come citare

Villanova, I. (2022). “Voicing Creative Uprisings”: Women and the Nigerian Diaspora in Buchi Emecheta’s Second-Class Citizen and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Americanah. De Genere - Rivista Di Studi Letterari, Postcoloniali E Di Genere, (7), 91–105. Recuperato da https://www.degenere-journal.it/index.php/degenere/article/view/164 (Original work published 31 marzo 2022)

Abstract

This article analyses two novels published by two writers of Nigerian-Igbo descent: Buchi Emecheta’s Second-Class Citizen (1974) and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Americanah (2013), examining the connections between the authors’ and their female characters’ movements and mobilities. This essay first compares the two fictions and the different migration experiences of the two novels’ main protagonists, Adah and Ifemelu, in the United Kingdom and the United States, respectively. Second, it shows how these texts can be read as what Carole Boyce Davies describes as “uprising textualities” (1997), that is, narratives of women’s resistance, reassertion, renewal and rethinking that simultaneously celebrate women’s creativity. Writing, indeed, plays a pivotal role for both the novelists and their characters. It is not only a tool to explore their personal experiences in the Global South and the complex relationships between their travels and the spaces of marginality in which they live, but it is also a political instrument to denounce social inequalities, challenge hegemonic representations, and Eurocentric and masculine epistemologies. This paper aims to demonstrate how the “South” also exists in the geographic North and how the novelists and their respective fictional characters, through writing, voice their “creative uprisings” and simultaneously negotiate their complex and multifaceted identities and subjectivities in different times and spaces.